Lord Lieutenant’s Awards

Lord Lieutenant’s Award for Exmouth’s Commanding Officer

An Exminster man has been honoured for outstanding service to the Air Training Corps, which he joined as a Cadet in the early 1980s – and never quite left!

LL DevonFlight Lieutenant Richard Bagnall, 44, received his second Certificate for Meritorious Service from the Lord Lieutenant of Devon, David Fursdon, during ceremonies at the Council House, Plymouth. The Certificate recognises service of an exceptionally high order by people connected with the Reserve Forces or uniformed cadet organisations.

Richard’s early experience as a Cadet was in Exeter at the age of 13. When the time came to leave, he became an adult instructor. “They never really let me go,” he says.

His long service continues in his present role of Officer Commanding 299 (Exmouth) Squadron which he has held since 2004.

The ATC is now very much a family affair. His elder son CWO Daniel Bagnall, aged 18, has recently taken part in Operation Global Dragon, an ATC adventure training expedition to the Drakensberg Mountains in South Africa. Younger son Matthew, aged 15, parades with the Exmouth Squadron.

 

Lord Lieutenant’s Award for Weston-Super-Mare’s Commanding Officer

Flt Lt Steve Manville, Officer Commanding 290 (Weston-Super-Mare) Squadron LL Somerset
received the prestigious Certificate for Meritorious Service from the Lord Lieutenant, Annie Maw, during ceremonies at the Bishop’s Palace, Wells. The Certificate recognises service of an exceptionally high order by people connected with the Reserve Forces or Uniformed Cadet organisations.

Steve has been involved with the ATC for 25 years, since he was a 14-year-old cadet. “I wanted to be an RAF pilot, as every Air Cadet does. But after I became a Senior Cadet and then Warrant Officer Cadet I went straight on to be an Adult Instructor.

“I then joined the staff, gained my Commission and became Officer Commanding 10 years ago.”

“It’s great to see them (Cadets) develop from a shy 12-year-old. When they leave at 20, they have so much confidence because of this organisation. Some can fly a glider solo at 16 – before they can drive a car.